My Precious…

myprecious.jpg
Photo from brilliantearth.com

I recently experienced some trials in getting my engagement ring fitted. I was told it would be easy, since virtually any jewelry store does fittings. But you can’t take your most prized piece of jewelry (or rather the only piece of jewelry with any real value that I own) to any jewelry store. I’d heard horror stories of sketchy places replacing the stone with cubic zirconium or something. Since my lovely engagement ring was ordered online (from brilliantearth.com, a conflict-free jewelry company that specializes in Canadian diamonds), bringing it back to the place of purchase (usually the best choice) was not an option.

I first asked my married friends, most of whom also had to get their rings fitted. But they’d all gone to small jewelers in their suburban home towns and I thought the city must have ample good options.

I first decided to go with a big chain store – Macy’s. I figured they’d be cheaper than Tiffany’s, but still a known name that should do a reasonably good job. Unfortunately, their jewelry department does not do fittings for rings not purchased at the store. They do work with an independent jeweler, located on one of the top floors. I went up there and found a warehouse atmosphere with boxes everywhere. There was a small area off in a corner with a counter and glass case filled with watches, but I looked around and at the rather young, inexperienced person at the counter and I ran. My Precious!!!!

Next I tried a local resource, astorians.net, for jewelry store recommendations. One helpful member suggested a place, but specifically noted that the jeweler had tried to sell her gold cleaner for her platinum band, which I took as a bad sign. Another member said, “Just go to wherever you got your ring. Fittings can damage the band and the setting.” Not comforting.

I tried to get some suggestions from theknot.com, but learned that you had to be signed up for 3 days before posting. By the time I was finally able to pop the question, my mother had already convinced me to follow the route of my friends and get my ring fitted at a local jeweler in my home town. While this involved time and transportation issues, it worked. The ring fits and looks beautiful.

Eventually, I did get a recommendation from theknot.com to simply go to the diamond district and just go to any jeweler in the area and ask them to do your ring while you wait. If they can’t, leave. If they can, you’re probably safe. This sounds like a good suggestion.

Another good thing to do is get your ring insured beforehand. Most Renter’s Insurance will cover it, though you should clarify that with the insurance company. If you don’t have renter’s insurance, I highly recommend it. It’s very easy to set up and cheap (less than $200 for a year). Very worth it to cover all possessions – particularly, your Precious…..

3 Comments so far

  1. Kathleen (unregistered) on September 27th, 2007 @ 3:03 pm

    I went to a local jeweler in my neighborhood who was able to do the sizing while I waited. If I hadn’t found that place, I had planned to head up to the diamond district and see if they could do it.

    The store where the ring was purchased told us it would take ten days to size, since they had to send it out! Crazy.


  2. sam (unregistered) on September 27th, 2007 @ 4:11 pm

    Any decent jeweler in the diamond district, if they can’t do it while you wait (more common for creating new settings, but still), will remove the diamond from the setting in your presence, give it to you, and when the refitting or new setting is complete, you return to the shop with your diamond, and they replace it in the setting in front of you.

    Never ever leave a diamond with anyone.


  3. youknow (unregistered) on September 27th, 2007 @ 7:34 pm

    You diamond became worthless the moment it left the store. Good luck with the insurance in case anything happens to it.



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